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Les 2021 Miserables (Penguin online Classics) outlet online sale

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Product Description

"He was no longer Jean Valjean, but No. 24601"

Victor Hugo’s tale of injustice, heroism and love follows the fortunes of Jean Valjean, an escaped convict determined to put his criminal past behind him. But his attempts to become a respected member of the community are constantly put under threat: by his own conscience, when, owing to a case of mistaken identity, another man is arrested in his place; and by the relentless investigations of the dogged policeman Javert. It is not simply for himself that Valjean must stay free, however, for he has sworn to protect the baby daughter of Fantine, driven to prostitution by poverty. A compelling and compassionate view of the victims of early nineteenth-century French society , Les Misérables is a novel on an epic scale, moving inexorably from the eve of the battle of Waterloo to the July Revolution of 1830. Norman Denny’s introduction to his lively English translation discusses Hugo’s political and artistic aims in writing  Les Misérables.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

Review

"Hugo''s genius was for the creation of simple and recognizable myth. The huge success of Les Misérables as a didactic work on behalf of the poor and oppressed is due to his poetic and myth-enlarged view of human nature." —V. S. Pritchett

 

"It was Tolstoy who vindicated [Hugo''s] early ambition by judging Les Misérables one of the world''s great novels, if not the greatest… [His] ability to present the extremes of experience ''as they are'' is, in the end, Hugo''s great gift." —From the Introduction by Peter Washington

About the Author

Victor Hugo (1802-85) was a forceful and prolific writer. He became a committed social democrat and during the Second Empire of Napoleon III was exiled from France, living in the Channel Islands. His body is now buried in the Pantheon. 

Norman Denny was educated at Radley College.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

From the Introduction by Peter Washington- Victor Hugo might be regarded as the Mr Toad of French literature: vain, arrogrant, pompous, selfish, cold and stingy; a windbag, a humbug and a fraud, absurdly puffed up with the immensity of his own greatness. But unlike Mr Toad, he was also an astute and energetic promoter of hisown image as a Great Man. The process began early. Writing in Hugo''s lifetime, Virginie Ancelot recalls the reception the young poet received in literary drawing-rooms when he arrived to read his latest ode. "...There was a few moments'' silence; then someone rose and approached him with visible emotion, took his hand and raised their eyes to heaven.The multitude listened. A single word was heard, to the great surprise of the uninitiated. And this word, which echoed in every corner of the salon, was:''Cathedral!''Then the orator returned to his place; another rose and cried out: ''Ogive!''A third looked round him and ventured:''Egyptian Pyramid!''The assembly applauded, and then it was lost in profound reflection." To the Anglo-Saxon mind - and, it should be said, to many Frenchmen - this is Parisian literary life at its worst: the posturing, the pretension, the self-regard, masquerading under the name of art. Yet Hugo is the man who wrote a handful of the most exquisite lyrics - ''Victor Hugo, helas!''said Gide when someone asked him to name the finest French poet - and at least one novel judged to be supreme. In his person, he sums up all that is most monsterous in writerly vanity; in his best work he transcended his failings. How did he do it? How did a monster come to write the masterpiece that is Les Miserables? * In an early essay on Scott, Hugo prophesies that"After the picturesque but prosaic novel of Walter Scott, there will still be another novel to create ... It is the novel which is at once drama and epic, picturesque and poetic, real and ieal, true and great, the novel which will enshrine Walter Scott in Homer."These words were written in 1823, just after the publication of his own first novel, Han d''Islande, and there is no doubt that Hugo had himself in mind as the man who could ''enshrine Walter Scott as Homer''. Anyone who can still get through this book may take a rather different view. Set in seventeeth-century Norway and dripping with gore on every page, Han d''Islande is nearer to the Gothic horror tradition than to Scott. For the man who really succeeded in reconciling the genres of epic and historic fiction we have to look further afield, to Hugo''s own admirerer, Tolstoy. Yet it was Tolstoy who vindicated the French novelist''s early ambition by judging Les Miserables one of the world''s great novels, if not the greates, and acknowledged its effect on his own work. Les Miserables was completed in 1862, shortly before the Russian novelist began War and Peace. The two novels are set in the same period. It cannot be said that Hugo had much to teach his junior about structure or characterization; like all his attempts at epic, in prose and verse, Les Miserables rambles, there are huge digressions and absurdities of plot, the characters are often thin, the action melodramatic. But in spacious, vigorous story-telling, in the use of an historical framework, in the relating of human events to a larger philosophical and spiritual context, in the deployment of fiction as a social and political weapon, in the exalatation of ''the people'' as a supreme authority, in the treatment of suffering as a dominant theme - in all these matters, Hugo exerted a profound influence on Tolstoy. Without his example, War and Peace might have been a very different novel. Perhaps the most extraordinary point of contact between them concerns Napoleon. One might expect the emperor to intrigue European writers in the early nineteenth century, as he intrigues Byron, Balzac and Stendhal, among others, but by the 1860s almost half a century had passed since Waterloo, yet Hugo and Tolstoy are still trying to unravel the mystery of one whose shadow falls across the entire century. For Tolstoy, Napoleon is pre-eminently a human being - an extraordinary man, certainly, the instrument of destiny, but still a man. For Hugo he is more like a superman, a mysterious brooding presence with almost divine powers. The point is made by an ironic comparison between Napoleon and Wellington. Hugo''s argument seems to be that Napoleon ought to have won Waterloo by sheer force of genius - indeed, that he did win it, when judged according to the rules of natural justice - but that Wellington achieved a victory on points by taking more care to spy out the lay of the battlefield and to estimate the balance of forces. Calculation is everything to the mundane Englishman, imagination nothing. When lightning flashes round the emperor''s head, the duke looks like a very ordinary man. While Napoleon surveys the heavens, Wellington consults his watch. Clearly, the image of general as genius was vital to Hugo''s own project of himself as a literary Napoleon, but there is more to it than that. Commentators have often lamented the digression on Waterloo which is quite unnecessary to the plot and, coming early in the book, throws it decisively out of its narrative stride. But Hugo, though careless of structural refinement, does have a more serious purpose here - a purpose from which Tolstoy must have learnt much, and not only in his description of Borodino. For Hugo, who in turn learnt so much from Scott, grasped the fact that by imprinting the significance of a decisive historical moment on the minds of his readers he could hugely enlarge the scope of his novel. Precisely because Les Miserables is about little people, the history of a great man is one means of linking their petty lives with the Infinite. (The link is made touchingly explicit in the chapter called ''In Which Little Gavroche Takes Advantage of Napoleon the Great''.) Even events as great as Waterloo, we are told, can hinge on details: the location of a ditch, the arrival of a platoon. Conversely, the most trivial life may exemplify a great truth - and in that sense, all lives are equally significant, for every existence embodies these truths. At the same time, Hugo''s treatment of Waterloo makes it clear that realities and appearances diverge as much in everyday life as they do in historical interpretation - and that the two divergences are linked. What a post-Waterloo Frenchman thinks of Napoleon helps to shape what he thinks of himself. Sometimes we try to envision history in our own image; sometimes we use it to understand ourselves; at all times we are formed by it without our knowledge. One function of fiction is to help us achieve that knowledge. Les Miserables is, among other things, an attempt to explain the people of the mid-nineteenth century to themselves. Jean Valjean finds himself in a certain situation because he is a poor Frenchman at a particular time. This is one version of Fate - the sociological and political explanation of things. But Valjean is like Waterloo: his life also has a deeper purpose, a hidden meaning. Hugo has a number of names for this meaning - Fate, Destiny, God, the Infinite. But whatever he calls it, we observe a complex dialogue throughout the book between the surface causes of Valjean''s predicament - poverty and ignorance - and their deeper meaning, to which he penetrates through suffering.

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4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
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skykid14
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It''s not a typical cheap story...reading Les Miserable is a LIFE EXPERIENCE.
Reviewed in the United States on June 4, 2018
Thank God I got the Kindle version for my Kindle Keyboard 3G. I read through 12% of the book before wondering ''how long will it take me to finish!!?". So I measured my reading speed pages-per-minute and estimated the total reading time for the entire book to be 64... See more
Thank God I got the Kindle version for my Kindle Keyboard 3G. I read through 12% of the book before wondering ''how long will it take me to finish!!?". So I measured my reading speed pages-per-minute and estimated the total reading time for the entire book to be 64 hours. Seriously. So I took a different approach: I would read for an hour or two, then when fatigue started setting in, I pressed the "shift-sym" keyboard shortcut to activate text-to-speech, and just sat back or laid in bed while the kindle AI voice read it to me. This book famously takes place in France, and a lot of the names of people / places / streets are in French, so it''s nice having the AI effortlessly pronounce them. My favorite was hearing it pronounce "Champs-Élysées" over and over again. It was pleasant, almost hypnotizing. Text-to-Speech allowed me to focus on the incredible story and not hassle through the pronunciations. Victor Hugo goes off on many tangents, such as 30+ page histories of the battle of waterloo, and the construction of the sewer system in Paris. It''s quite fascinating and adds much to the story. There are many nuanced scenes that I continually go back to in my head, like the back passages behind the court room for transporting lawyers, and the one for transporting the criminals. And the ideas of whether a person can ever redeem themselves in society, contrasted with the situation that society is often times a poor judge of how to redeem oneself, and whether they should be deserving of redemption. It is an honest critique of criminal justice that is probably as relevant today as it was then.

My understanding is that this "penguin classics" version has a better translation than the "free" version going around on the internet. It you''re going to devote ~64 hours to an experience of life and death in old France, best put in a few bucks to get the best translation possible. For today''s generation, the length of the story can be a bit jarring and leaves you wondering "will this story ever end?" I say this book is not at all to be treated as a story. It''s not a television show. It''s not a movie. It''s not a musical. Les Miserables is an EXPERIENCE. So get the good version on Kindle, and have the AI voice continue the reading when fatigue starts to set in.
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Reviewer No. 9
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
YOU WOULD IMAGINE that they would spend a couple cents making a good keepable cover
Reviewed in the United States on September 26, 2017
*This is a review of the Les Miserables Penguin Classics Hardcover* I will not comment on the work of the masterpiece itself, but I will talk about the book quality. It is highly disappointing, the hardcover is extremely cheaply made beyond what I... See more
*This is a review of the Les Miserables Penguin Classics Hardcover*

I will not comment on the work of the masterpiece itself, but I will talk about the book quality.

It is highly disappointing, the hardcover is extremely cheaply made beyond what I could imagine. If there isn''t an actual dust cover to it, YOU WOULD IMAGINE that they would spend a couple cents making a good keepable cover. The horrible colouring on the cover (The red birds on the twigs as pictured) can be taken off progressively just by picking up the book. Not intentionally, not by scratching at it, but literally, GRIPPING the book will erode away the red colouring on the cover.

Next, the sticker, it came with a warehouse inventory sticker that was on there for some amount of time. As you would imagine, since even touching the book will whittle away at it, the sticker has done considerable damage to the back cover as I took it off out of the box. No, I did not have to scratch off the sticker, I did not rip it and leave behind the white paper stuck to the book, no, the sticker came off just as ideally as I could want and it did a ton of cosmetic damage to the back cover.

Third, the size. I seen the size and I was skeptical of the quality, and I was right. The book is rather stiff, just as all hardcovers start, but the bad part is how small the book is in width. It is utterly uncomfortable to read until you basically break the book as you read it because of its cheapness.

To conclude, buy a damn e-book rather than this edition. It will probably save you 16 dollars or you can get it for free at Gutenburg.org. I was completely dissatisfied with getting a throw-away-after-you-read quality book I paid twenty dollars for. This is the last time I buy on Amazon and I advise others to do this as well. The site is behind the times with its integration of reviews to one book instead of one edition and I am often dissatisfied with the utterly cheap products I receive from book publishers.

I am asking for my money back after I post this review. I may respond to it with my results...
23 people found this helpful
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Katherine Queen
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Some good, some bad about this translation
Reviewed in the United States on January 22, 2021
Cannot go wrong with Norman Denny''s translation of this classic. I greatly enjoyed the story and the translation that was done by Norman Denny, but there are still some flaws regardless in the translation itself. I purchased the version from 1982, the paperback as shown on... See more
Cannot go wrong with Norman Denny''s translation of this classic. I greatly enjoyed the story and the translation that was done by Norman Denny, but there are still some flaws regardless in the translation itself. I purchased the version from 1982, the paperback as shown on the picture. While reading the book itself, some of the pages came loose from the binding, so the binding could have been better. There were some mistakes I found in the text. I enjoyed reading his translation all the way through and always found myself saying "they broke the mold when they chose Norman for this story". The only bad thing that I cannot forgive about his translation is this: it would have been perfect if not for this translation being abridged. This is my reason for 3 stars. It would have been better if the binding was better and if it was mistake free. This the one translation I decided to keep of the many translations I have read so far.
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Kyle L. Rhynerson
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Classic tale of love and penance
Reviewed in the United States on December 18, 2012
"Les Misérables" is an epic story of love and penance set against France''s political struggles in the 1800''s. The "love story" has typical elements involving a young man and woman, but the author also explores love of father, love of grandson, love of daughter, and love of... See more
"Les Misérables" is an epic story of love and penance set against France''s political struggles in the 1800''s. The "love story" has typical elements involving a young man and woman, but the author also explores love of father, love of grandson, love of daughter, and love of mankind. Penance is the other major element of the story brought out in the incredible life of Jean Valjean. God''s providence enables Valjaen to do good unto others in atonement for his past transgressions.

Overall, I enjoyed the story and example the author set throughout the book in doing good deeds to help others. The Bible says, "...all things work together for good to those who love God", and I enjoyed seeing how things ultimately worked out. In some cases, the result may not have been what a person desired in his or her own life, but God can and does work through us to accomplish His will. This is evident in life and in Victor Hugo''s story.

Reading this book requires a good amount of patience as Victor Hugo diverges into lengthy examinations of various topics (e.g., the Battle of Waterloo, the history of the Paris sewer system, etc.). He ultimately has a reason for these long discourses, but the pay-off is quite small for your investment of time. These sections do help the reader to understand the times and setting of the story, but I felt they were overly drawn out. I can see how many readers would give up on the book after trudging through pages of seemingly meaningless information.

I chose the Norman Denny translation, which is slightly abridged at 1,232 pages compared to Lee Fahnestock''s translation at 1,484 pages. I should note, the missing content is placed into appendices if you really want to get the full experience. Denny opted to abridge several sections where he felt Hugo ran too long and readers would not miss anything by skipping ahead in the story.
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manndrake
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Flawed Classic
Reviewed in the United States on April 8, 2014
This is the classic by Victor Hugo; the story of the redemption of the criminal Jean Valjean. If melodrama turns your stomach, this not the book for you. But this is more than a story. Just as Charles Dickens wrote about the plight of the poor in London, Hugo explains... See more
This is the classic by Victor Hugo; the story of the redemption of the criminal Jean Valjean. If melodrama turns your stomach, this not the book for you. But this is more than a story. Just as Charles Dickens wrote about the plight of the poor in London, Hugo explains what life is like for the poor in Paris in the early 1800''s. The problem with Les Misérables is Hugo''s many digressions. Marius'' father encounters the innkeeper Thenardier at Waterloo. So Hugo stops the story to recount the entire battle. Valjean and Cosette take refuge in a convent, so Hugo stops the story to give us page after page about convents in general and this one in particular. When Valjean saves Marius by carrying him through the sewers of Paris, Hugo stops to explain the Paris sewer system and waste treatment in the cities of this era. There are pages of description, and even the minor characters are given a complete backstory. Readers of today don''t have the patience to wade through all of this superfluous material. And every time he stops his story Hugo interrupts the dramatic flow of his plot. I first read this book when I was in school. The only way I got through it was by skipping the dull parts and I suggest you do the same. If you do, you will uncover a story about courage, forgiveness, and redemption, and that is the reason Les Misérables is still a classic.
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Richard Turnley
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One of the very best
Reviewed in the United States on July 28, 2018
What can one say negatively about one of the greatest books ever written. The first part concerning the humble and most christian bishop moves one to tears .There are various sections when Hugo goes at a tangent to the main story about Jean Valjean but these are... See more
What can one say negatively about one of the greatest books ever written. The first part concerning the humble and most christian bishop moves one to tears .There are various sections when Hugo goes at a tangent to the main story about Jean Valjean but these are interesting points of view. His account of the Battle of Waterloo is very different in that he gives little credit to Wellington but total credit to the English army .. Pity they made such trash films and musicals of this Epic
2 people found this helpful
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J. L. Tow
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wow this was a great book
Reviewed in the United States on May 28, 2013
I finished this book a few days ago, and I miss it. It''s sort of strange. I had a similar experience when I finished Lord of the Rings, but I think this is worse. I loved nearly everything about this book, even when it wasn''t exciting or emotional, I was fascinated. My only... See more
I finished this book a few days ago, and I miss it. It''s sort of strange. I had a similar experience when I finished Lord of the Rings, but I think this is worse. I loved nearly everything about this book, even when it wasn''t exciting or emotional, I was fascinated. My only serious complaint was the sewer chapter, but that was merely the timing of it (I skimmed some of that section, but went back and read it fully afterwards).

I have been a fan of the musical since I was six and have wanted to read the book for year, but just never had the reading stamina. The book adds so much detail and emotion to the musical. I''m very glad I waited until I was disciplined enough to get through this book in its entirety.

It has been nearly a month since I finished this book and I still cannot stop thinking about it. I have a feeling I may end up rereading this book within the year, because it just has not let go of me.

A word of warning for the Wilbur translation, though it says that it is not abridge, it basically is. There are several sections that are moved to an appendix at the end of the book. I marked the place where they were supposed to be so that I could read them in their intended place. The part about the convent is a bit tedious, but the bit about Argot was really interesting. Make sure you read that one because you will miss out on some interesting stuff.
4 people found this helpful
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Daniel Baughman
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book!
Reviewed in the United States on August 12, 2020
Great book!
3 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Qwerty Asdf
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Nicely bound - but watch out
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 12, 2018
Nicely bound - but watch out: this is not the latest (highly praised) translation in 2012 by Christine Donougher (& intro by Robert Tombs) - it is the slightly older (not so praised) 1972 translation and intro by Norman Denny...
18 people found this helpful
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alan p
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Les Miserables.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 21, 2019
I am reading this book in paperback. As it is a long and heavy book it is taking some time. So I could continue on holiday I purchased a kindle version that would be easier to carry. The book itself is in easy to read English, just a lot of it. I saw the recent TV version...See more
I am reading this book in paperback. As it is a long and heavy book it is taking some time. So I could continue on holiday I purchased a kindle version that would be easier to carry. The book itself is in easy to read English, just a lot of it. I saw the recent TV version of the story and wanted to see how it compared with the book. The book dives off into lots of descriptions of 1830''s France. This can interrupt the flow of the story. It helps if you are familiar with french history of the period. So far the tale is enjoyable. Note that I hav''nt finished it yet.
2 people found this helpful
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R. S. Stanier
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Epic, sprawling, exciting
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 3, 2016
A true monument of literature, it is hard to categorise. It''s part-thriller, part-history, part-philosophical treatise, part I don''t know what. At times, it was so exciting, I could not put it down; at other times, the various excursuses (on convents, on slang, on the Paris...See more
A true monument of literature, it is hard to categorise. It''s part-thriller, part-history, part-philosophical treatise, part I don''t know what. At times, it was so exciting, I could not put it down; at other times, the various excursuses (on convents, on slang, on the Paris sewer system...) palled. The pacing is like continental football: slow, slow, quick, quick, slow. You can see why it is a great subject for a musical, a film or a TV series: you can skip the digressions and cut to the great set piece scenes, in the Bishop''s study, on the barricades, in the Paris backstreets etc. It''s also emotionally overwrought, as characters are brought together through unlikely coincidence, in a manner that often happens in 19th Century novels. Here, the characters are also often presented facing a series of moral and spiritual crises, which gives the book a strong religious dimension. I don''t know why the review on one of the front covers cites Les Miserables as ''a humanist masterpiece'', because it''s heavily freighted with both covert and overt religious ideas and language, e.g. atonement and guilt and forgiveness, though I would add that you do not need to be religious to enjoy it. For me, I made a conscious effort to read it without having seen the film/ musical/ whatever first and I think that helped as there''s often a genuine ''what happens next'' urge compulsion to turn the next page. As you''re going to have to turn over 1200 pages to get to the end, that sort of thing helps. Certainly, you need to have a good run at it or you will get stuck halfway. I can see how for some the weight of historical detail, the superfluity of adjectives and general OTTness of it all might grate, but I enjoyed this almost all the way through and at times was genuinely spellbound. I''m now seriously encouraged to go on and read "Notre Dame de Paris" as a result, for example. One minor but nonetheless annoying feature of the Kindle version is that the scanning/ transfer process has gone wrong so that the word ''die'' usually gets translated as ''the''; there must have been some glitch in the system. You expect more from Penguin Classics.
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Izzielickedabee
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Sprawling tale that fails to deliver on its early promise
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 15, 2018
I read this in the Penguin Classics'' edition. A sprawling tale which follows the fortunes and misfortunes of Jean Valjean. The first two-thirds of this were utterly gripping but then the novel descended into a mire of sentimentality and long-drawn out scenes and all I...See more
I read this in the Penguin Classics'' edition. A sprawling tale which follows the fortunes and misfortunes of Jean Valjean. The first two-thirds of this were utterly gripping but then the novel descended into a mire of sentimentality and long-drawn out scenes and all I wanted was for it to end. If ever a novel was in need of serious editing it''s this one. Only for diehard fans of classic French literature or of the many Les Mis adaptations.
3 people found this helpful
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A.R.F
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One of the Classics to have and appreciate
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 31, 2018
This book is remarkable. It is huge in every way, and the story seems to progress in slow ponderous movement, more like a glacier than the bubbling streams we are used to in modern literature, but the depth of detail is captivating. It is by no means a rollicking read (be...See more
This book is remarkable. It is huge in every way, and the story seems to progress in slow ponderous movement, more like a glacier than the bubbling streams we are used to in modern literature, but the depth of detail is captivating. It is by no means a rollicking read (be prepared to read for an hour and then putting it down for a week), it is hugely satisfying. Jean Valjean''s journey to redemption is just one of the pieces in the tapestry expertly woven by a master storyteller, and the character development of even almost insignificant characters in the story is precise and highly readable. A true work of genius.
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Les 2021 Miserables (Penguin online Classics) outlet online sale

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Les 2021 Miserables (Penguin online Classics) outlet online sale

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